The Method Behind the Unabridged Madness

Written by O'Brian Gunn

 Might be best to wait until the final coda of  A Song of Ice and Fire  before we dive back in.

Might be best to wait until the final coda of A Song of Ice and Fire before we dive back in.

So why only review finished stories? Mainly because we’ve reached (and seem to be surpassing) peak content overload these days. How many TV series, books, podcasts, movie franchises, comic book/graphic novel series are you in the middle of watching/listening to/being delightfully assaulted by right now? And how many other things do you have going on in your life that are eating away at your time, no matter how much enjoyment you might derive from them? More than likely, quite a lot.

I’ve always loved stories, and I’ve always loved how you can watch/experience characters from your favorite stories grow, change, and learn in ways they usually don’t or can’t when it comes to the standard movie/TV show format. That being said, it can also be more than a little exhausting keeping up with so many different characters, story developments, and plot twists (Who’s the father of Debra’s baby again?). Gotta have Netflix and Hulu and Comixology and Amazon Prime and HBO GO and whatever other new streaming service is rolling out. Now your wallet is burning along with the hours of the day.

With finished stories, you have an easier way to get your fix without the stress, nor is there a lengthy commitment contract that makes you feel like you’re being locked into an apartment lease (but much more enjoyable, and with muuuuch better neighbors). You know for a fact how many seasons/chapters/books there are, there’s no need to worry about the story being canceled right when things really start (or fail) to take off, you don’t have to worry about waiting in anticipation for the next season to premiere, and you don’t have to rewatch or reread past episodes/seasons/books as a refresher before the next installment (I know I’m not the only one who does this...am I?).

 When an oh-so-very intriguing comic book run comes out right as you're financially recovering from your last haul at the comic book store.

When an oh-so-very intriguing comic book run comes out right as you're financially recovering from your last haul at the comic book store.

Something else to think about is that there are plenty of graphic novels/comic books, movies, and TV shows that have had a complete run that you might not be aware of, ones that just might become some of your new favorites. Who knows?

            At the end of every month, I’ll share in-depth reviews from both major and minor creators, leaning toward independent and lesser-known names and publishers to give them the exposure they rightfully deserve. After all, it’s no secret that the indie and creator-owned scene is one that truly dives fathoms-deep into the expansive creative ether and brings us pearls we’ve never dreamed of before, ones untarnished by corporate agendas, checklists, interference, and the like.

Hopefully, you’ll be introduced to more than a few new narratives and creators you’ve never heard of from a variety of mediums as you’re between ongoing stories, or when you’re ready to take a breather from climbing Mt. Colossal Content.

And don’t worry, I won’t wake you ‘til it’s done.

 Cover of Charles Burns'  Black Hole .

Cover of Charles Burns' Black Hole.

First up: Black Hole, a graphic novel from Charles Burns set in 1970s Seattle that explores what happens when teenage sexual contact becomes a sexual plague, one that leaves behind physical deformities that are subtle for some and so grotesque for others that they are forced to live outside of town.